Human beings to the vet Facebook porn pics of the revenge

Getty Images

Human beings instead of algorithms you’re going to see the naked pictures voluntarily sent to Facebook in a schema that is currently being tested in Australia to combat revenge porn.

The BBC understands that the members of Facebook’s community operations team is look at the images in order to make a “fingerprint” of them to prevent a re-load.

Facebook will notify the person once the photo has been ‘hash’.

It will be up to the sender to remove the image.

The trial, which could spread to other countries, is seen as a way of allowing users greater control over their intimate photos – which offers a a pre-emptive protection against the misuse of the images by disgruntled ex-lovers.
‘Redouble efforts’

Users who wish to participate in the program must first complete an online form on the Australian e-safety commissioner’s web site.

Then, they need to message themselves with their nude photos through Messenger and e-safety commissioner’s office will notify Facebook of your presentation.

A Facebook of the official community can have access to those photos as a “hash” of them, and you will be notified to the person through the secure email provided via the commissioner’s website.

Revenge porn is a growing problem in Australia, where studies show that one out of every five women age 18-45 may have been victims.

Experts in the field have welcomed the initiative, but have warned that only address the problem on Facebook and its partner sites, WhatsApp and Instagram.

Prof Clare McGlynn, Durham Law School, said that the uk should establish an organization similar to the Australian e-safety committee.

“We must redouble efforts to challenge the root causes most demanding, those who share images without the consent,” he said.

“We condemn these forms of non-consensual sexual activity in the strongest terms, and work with young people”.