Apple started to slow down last year’s iPhone 8, 8 Plus and iPhone X

In the latest iOS 12.1 new feature of performance management CPU iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and X. But you can disable it.

In the latest iOS 12.1 new feature of performance management CPU iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and X. But you can disable it.

This week Apple released the latest iOS 12.1, and, as it turned out, it added the function of intentional slowing of smartphones in the last year’s model iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and X.
How it works

The function of performance management reduces the maximum operating frequency of the mobile processor to avoid overheating, to prevent unexpected shutdown and extend the “life” of the battery.

Apple admitted the use of the throttle (so called slowdown “Oldies”) at the end of last year. Only if the company did everything secretly, after the scandal had to do this function “voluntary” since iOS version 11.3. That is, the user decides to slow down your gadget or “roll back” to older versions of iOS, abandoning the innovations.
Someone slow

Before the performance mode worked on iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and iPhone SE the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. Now, with the release of the iPhone XS, XS and XR Max iPhone, the number of “obsolete” and recorded last year’s iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and X.

But Apple assures that the owners of these smartphones will experience virtually no side effects. “iPhone 8 and later models use more sophisticated software and hardware, which allows for more accurate assessment of consumption of the battery resource and its residual capacity, affecting the performance of the system — say in the company. — This allows the system to predict [changes output] and to prevent unexpected shutdown of the device. As a result, the effect of the performance management will be less noticeable in the iPhone 8 and newer. However, over time, with decreasing battery capacity, the effects will become more noticeable.”

We will remind, the option Battery Saver Mode can be disabled in settings.

Source: Apple