Flickr free will reduce from 1 TB up to 1,000 photos. And remove the “extra”

The takeover of Yahoo the media giant Verizon got in his possession and a popular photo sharing site Flickr, but this spring the service sold the company SmugMug. And now the new owner decided to close the free plan with terabyte storage.

The takeover of Yahoo the media giant Verizon got in his possession and a popular photo sharing site Flickr, but this spring the service sold the company SmugMug. And now the new owner decided to close the free plan with terabyte storage.

The takeover of Yahoo the media giant Verizon got in his possession and a popular photo sharing site Flickr, but this spring the service sold the company SmugMug. And now the new owner decided to close the free plan with terabyte storage.
Why?

In Flickr explained that the free services are rarely truly free. They have to pay either time or their data. And because the company does not intend to sell personal information to advertisers, the conditions had to be changed. In the near future, the storage size will be reduced from 1 TB up to thousands of photos and videos.
What you need to know?

The new rules will come into force on 8 January 2019. If the free account is more than a thousand snapshots, the user can not upload new files. “Extra” will need to save to another location, as after February 5, Flickr will delete everything that is outside the limit, starting with the oldest photos.

For those who need more space, there is a plan, Flickr Pro costs from $50 per year, until the end of November, the service provides a 30% discount. A premium account includes a website with no ads, advanced statistics, ability to save video clips up to 10 minutes instead of three (the function will be added in 2019), as well as special offers from our partners.

By the way, to 2013 free Flickr account is allowed to store only 200 photos.
One more thing…

In January, the service will lose their tight binding to Yahoo, and to enter you can use any email. Now Flickr is moving on the servers of Amazon Web Services (AWS), it will help to make it even faster and more stable.

Source: Flickr (1, 2)