Legal challenge to US sex trafficking law

Craigslist

Digital rights activists are at the start of a legal challenge to a law aimed at combating trafficking for sexual purposes.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), said the “poorly written” law may hamper efforts to help victims and prosecute traffickers.

The Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act (Fosta) also impinges on the freedom of speech laws, the allegations of the prosecution.

The EFF wants the law declared unconstitutional to prevent it from being applied.To repeat the warning

In a blog post announcing its lawsuit, the EFF said that the law had to be stopped because, in its current form, it was harming a lot of people who work on behalf of sex workers and the victims.

In particular, said the EFF, the wave of language in Fosta puts those calling for the decriminalization of sex work, or who try to establish a greater recognition of prostitutes and others in the trade, at the risk of prosecution.

In addition, he said, the right of the sape, established protections for websites that host content posted by users.

Fosta “greatly magnifies the risk of these net companies bear if they choose to show ads or forums dedicated to these sexual professions,” he said.

The net companies, including Craigslist, Reddit and other closed forums, and chat rooms dedicated to the purchase and sale of sex by fear of prosecution.

The law also limited the work of organizations that are trying to help people who offer sexual services, said the EFF. One of them is VerifyHim, which recorded descriptions of the violence in clients to help workers avoid.

The EFF legal challenge is also facilitated by the Internet Archive, Human Rights Watch and the Woodhull Freedom Foundation. In addition, the two individuals have the backup, he is a spokesperson for the sex worker and the other a masseur that has become hard to advertise his non-sexual service.

The U.S. Congress has repeatedly warned that Fosta would not achieve its objectives and was likely to encourage the censorship widespread, said the EFF.